Liverpool Wonderland MicroAdventures

Liverpool Wonderland: Like a Dream but Better

Liverpool Wonderland
Written by Kirstie Pelling

Liverpool Wonderland
Like a Dream but Better…

Fairy lit Christmas trees process down the aisle along with choristers, ministers, and The Pope. That’s according to Cameron, who whispers it loudly as he passes. The rest of us smile politely at the Bishop of Warrington.

The Anglican Cathedral in Liverpool (not the wigwam shaped one – that belongs to the Catholics) is the largest in England and the annual Holly Bough carol service begins in semi darkness with Once in Royal David’s City, sung by a solo chorister. It feels like he is alone amongst the vast arches and towering walls. But he isn’t. At the end of the service, hundreds of people head through the gates, past the huge festive wreath, and down the stairs, to be swallowed up by this northern city.

The Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool after the Holly Bough Carol Service

The Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool after the Holly Bough Carol Service

Is that our limo?

“Is that our limousine over there?” It’s likely. There are hundreds of people pouring out of Liverpool Cathedral on this dusty winter’s evening. None of them are being picked up by an 8 seater Hummer.

Except us.

Liverpool Limousine

This eight person Hummer is one of the smaller Hollywood Limos

“How far are we going?” asks Cameron. I tell him it’s a five minute ride.

“How much does that cost?” Cameron asks the driver, who gets out to open our doors and take a picture.

“About fifty grand,”says the driver.

“For five minutes! That’s really expensive,” my son cries.

“I don’t know about that. Some of our other limo’s are worth up to a hundred and fifty grand,” says the driver.

“How many limousines does he have?” whispers Matthew, impressed. Having just watched a season of Young Apprentice on TV, he’s interested in wealth creation.

Liverpool Limousine

There’s much excitement inside the limo

Lasers and fairylights

The limo proceeds through town to much excitement within, and absolutely no excitement from the city of Liverpool. They are used to party buses and limousines.

“Dad’s got a palm tree on his cheek,”

“I’ve got lasers going through my stomach!”

“I’ve got this neat button on my seatbelt. I don’t even have to release it!”

“What if we had a crash. All those champagne glasses would be broken.”

The driver tells us we should have been here last week, when Herbert the celebrity hairdresser paid for Santa come over from Lapland, so local children could meet him. “It cost thousands,” he says. My children take this in, and I suspect they’re starting to think everyone in Liverpool is seriously rich.

For a change Cameron is quiet. He’s peering out through the front, over the shoulder of the driver. His face is framed by the illuminated Big Wheel.

Liverpool Limousine

“It’s like a dream but better…” The Liverpool Wheel from the Hollywood Limo

“It’s like a dream, but better,” he says quietly. The Pope, Santa, a limousine and now a giant Ferris Wheel. And we’ve only been here two hours. What more could this city provide for a nine year old in search of a little excitement?

The Joker Boat.

Joker Boat Liverpool

It’s no joke.. it’s the Joker Boat, Liverpool Albert Dock

Read more from our  Liverpool Adventures: 

About the author

Kirstie Pelling

Kirstie is the Editor of The Family Adventure Project. A professional writer and poet, she's the creative and journalistic force behind many of the stories and features published here. She's a co-founder and co-director of The Family Adventure Project and also works as the #poetinmotion producing and performing poetry for print, video and live performance.

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We're Kirstie & Stuart. We share an adventurous spirit, a passion for indie travel and 3 kids. The Family Adventure Project is our long term experiment in doing active, adventurous things together. Find out more...

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